As if! Clueless-themed pop-up restaurant experience…

Oh hey, there’s a Clueless-themed pop-up restaurant experience coming to Los Angeles. It’s named As If!, a reference to main character Cher’s catchphrase.

Clueless
Stacey Dash, Alicia Silverstone, and Brittany Murphy starred in Clueless.

The opening’s been delayed, but it sounds like a fun way to commemorate the 25th anniversary of this Emma-inspired film:

The company behind As If also created TV pop ups including Saved by the Max, Good Burger, The Peach Pit and the Breaking Bad experience. No word yet on the reason why they have decided to postpone the Clueless pop up.

With Amy Heckerling’s iconic ’90s romantic comedy Clueless celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, the minds behind immersive experiences such as Saved by the Max, Good Burger, The Peach Pit and the Breaking Bad experience are opening “As If!” a new pop up that will leave fans of the popular pic singing “Rollin’ with the homies” as they are immersed in the world of the film’s fashion-savvy heroine and way existential Cher Horowitz (played by Alicia Silverstone).

Emma Adaptations Pages Image Gallery!

EmmaFeatured here are all the publicity stills, screencaps, posters, lobby cards, and other image-based materials related to all of the Jane Austen Emma film and television adaptations and various editions of the novel. Productions included are the 1972 BBC adaption starring Doran Godwin (Emma 1), the 1996 Miramax adaptation starring Gwyneth Paltrow (Emma 2), the 1997 ITV/A&E version starring Kate Beckinsale (Emma 3), the 2009/2010 BBC/PBS version starring Romola Garai (Emma 4), the 2020 adaptation starring Anya Taylor-Joy (Emma 5), and the “Bollywood” Emma, Ayesha, from 2010. Eventually, I may also add some Clueless (1995) media.

I’ve also included some illustrations from various editions of the novel, most of which were sent to me by my friend Cinthia:

    • There are illustrations by Charles Edmund Brock (1870-1938) from 1898 and 1909 editions of Emma.
    • The 1898 edition Brock Illustrations are American reproductions of earlier versions presented in an English edition. The watercolor Brock illustrations come from a 1909 edition of the novel published by J.M. Dent & Co. in London and by  E.P. Dutton & Co. in New York.
    • There are also illustrations by Philip Gough from an 1948 edition published by McDonald & Co., illustrations by Fritz Kredel from a 1964 edition from Heritage Press, and black and white “line” drawings by Hugh Thomson from another edition.
    • Learn more about Emma, the novel
    • Learn more about Emma novel illustrations

Since my old gallery script ceased to function, I’m bringing everything back right here using Gallery for WordPress. Please bear with me while I fine-tune this album and add new content. 🙂 To see the albums, continue past the jump…

Continue reading “Emma Adaptations Pages Image Gallery!”

Emma Adaptations Pages roundup: onstage in Chicago and Emma 2020 coming to North America very soon!

A few general Emma Adaptations updates!

First, Emma 2020, starring Anya Taylor-Joy and directed by Autumn de Wilde, is coming to North American theatres starting next week! For my updates on the film, keep watching my Emma 2020/Emma 5 blog tag/feed.

Second, Paul Gordon’s Emma musical is onstage at Chicago Shakespeare Theatre through March 15. It stars Lora Lee Gayer as Emma Woodhouse and Brad Stanley as Mr. Knightley.

Chicago Shakespeare Theatre Emma
Chicago Shakespeare Theatre’s Emma

Reviews of the production:

Third, my old gallery script was completely nuked in a PHP server update, so I’m converting all of my Emma media to a WordPress gallery as soon as I can. Be watching for it! 🙂

Another Emma is well and truly coming…

 

Emma 2020 Poster

 

So The latest film adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma is coming in early 2020, set to release in the US and UK in February…

Continue reading “Another Emma is well and truly coming…”

Old Emma updates from Fall, 2018…

Just some housekeeping, to keep the Emma update feed complete…

Jane Austen’s Emma onstage and adapted in a contemporary novel

Having just celebrated 200 years of publication this past December, Jane Austen’s Emma deserves an extended anniversary party! This spring, the novel is celebrated by the release of Katie Heaney’s Dear Emma – a contemporary adaptation of the original story – and a stage run of Jon Jory’s Emma at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company.

Emma at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company runs through March 26. Heaney’s novel, featuring a college-aged advice columnist named Harriet struggling with love and friendship, is available now via Amazon.

For more about Jane Austen and Emma:

Cincy Shakes presents Emma
Cincy Shakes presents Emma.

Jane Austen’s Emma is almost 200!

Gwyneth Paltrow as Emma
Gwyneth Paltrow as Emma (1996 Miramax adaptation).

It’s hard to believe that December will mark the 200th anniversary of Emma‘s publication. The recent lead up’s been pretty interesting, including a modern retelling of the novel by Alexander McCall Smith and Pemberley Digital’s multimedia Emma Approved adaptation, which wrapped last year. Various organizations, including the Bay Area English Regency Society in the San Francisco Bay Area, are organizing celebrations commemorating the event. Even though it’s not popular on the same level as, say, Pride & Prejudice, people love Emma because it has a little something for everyone.

Before writing Emma, Jane Austen once expressed, “I am going to take a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like” (James Edward Austen-Leigh’s Memoir of Jane Austen, p. 158). Most believe that the author was at least half-joking when she said this, as Emma Woodhouse is often a great favorite among readers. The character aside, however, the story itself is simply brilliant. Part romance, part comedy, part drama, and part “detective novel,” adapters for stage and screen have lots of choice when it comes to direction and focus. If the depth and texture of the novel has a limitation, it’s in the fact that most adaptations can’t do justice to everything it offers (not even the long miniseries versions).

Jane Austen wrote Emma over the period encompassing January 21, 1814 – March 29, 1815. At his request, she dedicated Emma to her most high-profile fan, the Prince Regent. This is a bit strange, considering that she didn’t care much for him, his conduct towards his wife, or his personality in general. He received a special first edition of the novel (one of twelve “presentation” copies issued by the publisher), in three volumes, which is kept at the Royal Library at Windsor Castle. For more on the presentation edition, see this description of Anne Sharp’s copy (Bonhams auction site). Novelist Maria Edgeworth – a favorite of Austen’s – also apparently received a presentation copy of the novel.

First published in December, 1815 (though the frontispiece is dated 1816) by John Murray, Emma was the last work Austen lived to see released. The first edition consisted of 2000 copies. Oddly, the book did not sell well, so the second printing/edition didn’t happen until 1833. For more information on the initial publication of the novel, look here. You will also find opinions on the novel from Austen’s friends and family right here.

For more on Jane Austen’s Emma and its various media adaptations, visit the Emma Adaptations Pages.

Alexander McCall Smith’s Emma reboot coming soon to The Austen Project!

Alexander McCall Smith's Emma reboot - a tribute to Jane Austen's original novel
Alexander McCall Smith’s Emma reboot – a tribute to Jane Austen’s original novel.

Well, it looks like the wait’s a-shrinking for the Emma reboot by famed mystery novelist Alexander McCall Smith. This Jane Austen retelling is coming to the UK, Australia, and New Zealand in early November. According to Amazon.com, preorders are open for the US edition, scheduled to release in April.

Here’s the novel teaser from the official “The Austen Project” website:

Fresh from university, Emma Woodhouse arrives home in Norfolk ready to embark on adult life with a splash. Not only has her sister, Isabella, been whisked away on a motorbike to London, but her astute governess, Miss Taylor is at a loose end watching as Mr. Woodhouse worries about his girls. Someone is needed to rule the roost and young Emma is more than happy to oblige.

At the helm of her own dinner parties, and often found either rearranging the furniture at the family home of Hartfield, or instructing her new protégée, Harriet Smith, Emma is in charge. You don’t have to be in London to go to parties, find amusement or make trouble. Not if you’re Emma, the very big fish in the rather small pond.

But for someone who knows everything, Emma doesn’t know her own heart. And there is only one person who can play with Emma’s indestructible confidence, her friend and inscrutable neighbour George Knightly – this time has Emma finally met her match?